Drama Screenplay Contest

Organizer: Screencraft

Open to: All, 18+
A writer who has earned more than $50,000 (or equivalent currency) from professional writing services for film or TV in the preceding year is not eligible. (Contest winnings not included.)

Length: Minimum of 75 to maximum 140 pages

Genre or Subject: Drama

Prizes:

  • First place wins $1,000 plus other prizes
  • Second place wins $500 plus other prizes

Deadlines: 
Early deadline: July 15th, 2018
Final deadline: September 12th, 2018 – $69 submission fee

Please read the rules before entering the competition

Short Screenplay Contest

Organizer: Screencraft

Open to: All, 18+
A writer who has earned more than $50,000 (or equivalent currency) from professional writing services for film or TV in the preceding year is not eligible. (Contest winnings not included.)

Length: Minimum of 5 to maximum 35 pages

Genre or Subject: Short

Prizes:

  • First place wins $1,000 plus other prizes
  • Second place wins $500 plus other prizes

Deadlines: 
Early deadline: May 10th, 2018
Final deadline: August 1st, 2018 – $49 submission fee

Please read the rules before entering the competition

Horror Screenplay Contest

Organizer: Screencraft

Open to: All, 18+
A writer who has earned more than $50,000 (or equivalent currency) from professional writing services for film or TV in the preceding year is not eligible. (Contest winnings not included.)

Length: Maximum 140 pages

Genre or Subject: Horror

Prizes:

  • First place wins $1,000 plus other prizes
  • Second place wins $500 plus other prizes

Deadlines: 
Early deadline: April 15th, 2018
Final deadline: July 1st, 2018 – $59 submission fee

Please read the rules before entering the competition

Comedy Screenplay Contest

Organizer: Screencraft

Open to: All, 18+
A writer who has earned more than $50,000 (or equivalent currency) from professional writing services for film or TV in the preceding year is not eligible. (Contest winnings not included.)

Length: Maximum 140 pages

Genre or Subject: Comedy

Prizes:

  • First place wins $1,000 plus other prizes
  • Second place wins $200 plus other prizes

Deadlines: 
Early deadline: April 1st, 2018
Final deadline: May 17th, 2018 – $59 submission fee

Please read the rules before entering the competition

Shore Scripts – Feature Screenplay Contest

Organizer: Shore Scripts

Open to: All
A writer who has earned more than $30,000 (or equivalent currency) since 2010 in screenwriting fees is not eligible. (Contest winnings not included.)

Length: Recommended 80 to 120 pages

Genre or Subject: All

Prizes:

  • First place wins $4,000 plus other prizes
  • Second place wins $1,000 plus other prizes
  • Third place wins $500 plus other prizes
  • Fourth place wins $250 plus other prizes
  • Fifth place wins lots of other prizes

Deadlines: 
Early deadline: March 1st, 2018 – $45 Submission fee
Regular deadline: June 1st, 2018 – $50 Submission fee
Final deadline: August 1st, 2018 – $60 submission fee

Please read the rules before entering the competition

Script Template
Advice, Screenwriting

MS Word Script Template

Following the interest from my Script Formatting Guide, I thought I’d knock together an MS Word template with the margins set and the most common format styles set up as shortcuts. If you’d like a copy, then just Enter your email below. Oh, I couldn’t find a suitable photo for this, so I thought I’d use one of a cute puppy.

MS Word Script Template (49 downloads)

It’s a very basic template, but if you would like anything added, then drop me a line.

Why not sign up as a subscriber and make sure you don’t miss any future articles or downloads.

Advice, Creative Writing, Screenwriting

How To Write Show Vs. Tell

“Show, don’t tell” must be one of the most often heard pieces of advice writers hear. But what on earth does it really mean? I think it’s easier to start with an example; “John felt scared,” is a perfect example of ‘telling.’ The same thing but done as ‘showing’ would be, “John cowered.” By using the second example, you are showing the reader how John felt; it puts a picture in the reader’s head. And, this is the golden rule to try and follow. Continue reading “How To Write Show Vs. Tell”

Grammarly Dissected photo
Advice, Grammar

The Grammarly Tool Dissected – A Personal Review

Whether you’re a veteran or a virgin to the world of writing, Grammarly is one of those tools that can help improve your prose. As a proofreader, Grammarly is one of my sanity-checking tools. Even at the standard membership level, the functionality is useful.

Continue reading “The Grammarly Tool Dissected – A Personal Review”

What's in a Script photo
Advice, Screenwriting

Components Of A Script

One question every single fledgling scriptwriter asks is, “How do I write a script?” In this article, we are going to break a script down into its component pieces and explore what you can do to make them better. This article should be read in conjunction with How To Format A Script. So, without further ado, let’s get to it…

Continue reading “Components Of A Script”